DOI: 10.1007/s00259-018-4173-2Pages: 87-96

Prognostic role of baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT metabolic parameters in Burkitt lymphoma

1. University of Brescia and Spedali Civili Brescia, Nuclear Medicine

2. Spedali Civili, Division of Hematology

Correspondence to:
Domenico Albano
Tel: +39-30-3995468
Email: doalba87@libero.it

Close

Abstract

Purpose

Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive lymphoma subtype with high 18F-FDG avidity at 18F-FDG-PET/CT, but no validated criteria for PET/CT in treatment evaluation or prediction of outcome in BL are available. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the metabolic baseline PET/CT parameters can predict treatment response and prognosis in BL.

Materials and methods

We retrospectively enrolled 65 patients who underwent baseline 18F-FDG-PET/CT, interim and end of treatment PET/CT. The PET images were analyzed visually and semi-quantitatively by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value body weight (SUVbw), the maximum standardized uptake value lean body mass (SUVlbm), the maximum standardized uptake value body surface area (SUVbsa), lesion to liver SUVmax ratio (L-L SUV R), lesion to blood-pool SUVmax ratio (L-BP SUV R), total metabolic tumor volume (tMTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Survival curves were plotted according to the Kaplan–Meier method.

Results

At a median follow-up of 40 months, the median PFS and OS were 34 and 39 months. MTV and TLG were significantly higher in patients with partial response compared to complete response group at end of treatment, while no significant differences were found at interim. Other metabolic PET/CT parameters were not related to treatment response. MTV and TLG were demonstrated to be independent prognostic factors for both PFS and OS; instead SUVbw, SUVlbm, SUVbsa, L-L SUV R and L-BP SUV R were not related to outcome survival.

Conclusions

Metabolic tumour features (MTV and TLG) were significantly correlated with response to treatment and long-term outcome.

To access the full text, please Sign in

If you have institutional access, please click here

  • Accepted: Sep 17, 2018
  • Online: Oct 2, 2018

Article Tools

eanm
EJNMMI Ad